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  A. A. Milne A. P. Mller Abraham Lincoln Abraham Maslow Adam Smith Adolf Hitler Aksel Sandemose Al Capone Albert Einstein Alec Guinness Alexander Graham Bell Alexander Pope Alexandre Dumas Alfred Hitchkock Alfred Nobel Andy Warhol Anne Morrow Lindbergh Aristoteles Aristoteles Onassis Arthur C. Clarke Arthur Miller Asger Jorn Astrid Lindgren Benjamin Franklin Bertolt Brecht Bill Cosby Bill Gates Bob Hope Brigitte Bardot C. G. Jung C. S. Lewis Charles Darwin Charles De Gaule Charlie Chaplin Dalai Lama Dale Carnegie David Livingstone Dean Martin Dwight D. Eisenhower Ernest Hemmingway Francois De Voltaire Franz Kafka Friedrich Nietzsche George Bernard Shaw George Orwell Groucho Marx H. C. Andersen Homer Simpson Humphrey Bogart Johannes Mllehave Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe John F. Kennedy John Maynard Keynes John Steinbeck Karen Blixen Konfutse Leonardo Da Vinci Ludvig Holberg Mahatma Gandhi Marcus Aurelius Mark Twain Martin Luther King Jr. Marilyn Monroe Mogens Glistrup Muhammad Ali Napoleon Bonaparte Niels Bohr Oscar Wilde Pablo Picasso Platon Ralph Waldo Emerson Robert Louis Stevenson Ronald Reagan Rudyard Kipling Sigmund Freud Sren Kirkegaard Steven Wright Storm P. Thomas Jefferson Victor Borge Victor Hugo Vincent Van Gogh W. C. Fields William Shakespeare Winston Churchill Woody Allen  
CITATER - WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

 

 

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Danske citater:

  • Den, som dør, betaler hele sin gæld
  • Der har levet mange store mænd, der har smigret folket, men egentlig aldrig elsket det
  • Det er ikke enhver sky, som føder en storm.
  • Det er tåbelig afgudsdyrkelse at gøre gudstjenester vigtigere end Gud
  • Det glade hjerte lever længst.
  • Døden er en gæld, som ingen kan betale mere end èn gang
  • Elsk alle, stol på nogle få, gør ondt mod ingen.
  • En hest - en hest. Mit kongerige for en hest.
  • Endnu har der ikke levet nogen filosof, som var til at holde ud, når han havde tandpine.
  • Enhver mand, der ønsker at leve godt, må prøve at stole på sig selv og leve uden samvittighed. , Richard III
  • Han tænker for meget; den slags folk er farlige
  • Hvad fluer er for kåde dreng, er vi for guderne; de dræber os for morskab
  • Hvad ligger der i et navn? Det, vi kalder en rose, ville dufte lige sødt, hvilket navn det end havde
  • Hvor der er virkeligt venskab, behøves ingen ceremonier
  • Hvor tandpinen begynder, holder filosofien op
  • Håb er ofte en jagthund uden spor.
  • Ingen kan få ham til at le ­ men det er ikke så mærkelig. Han drikker ikke vin
  • Ingen var hinanden så smerteligt tro, som Julie og hendes Romeo, En større sorg i verden ingen ved, end Romeo og Julie's kærlighed. , Romeo og Julie
  • Intet dyr er så vildt, at de ikke føler medlidenhed. Jeg føler ingen medlidenhed, derfor er jeg intet dyr.
  • Jeg ville være lidet lykkelig, hvis jeg kunne sige hvor meget.
  • Klog og forelsket er ingen dødelig.
  • Korthed er viddets sjæl
  • Lykken er som en parfume: Vi kan ikke stænke den på en anden, uden at et par dråber rammer os selv
  • Mange, der bærer en kårde, frygter folk, der kun har en pennepose i hånden.
  • Når enden er god, er alting godt
  • Selv krystere kan, når de er forelskede, få noget mere ædelt i deres natur, end der er dem medfødt.
  • Smerten er gift for skønheden.
  • Som enhver søn dog kan begejstre sin moder.
  • Sorger kommer ej som spioner, en og en ad gangen, men i eskadroner
  • Spiritus øger lysten, men hæmmer evnen
  • Troskab mod en nar gør selv vor troskab dum.
  • Vi er den slags stof, som drømme er lavet af, og vort lille liv afrundes med en søvn.
  • Vi ved hvad vi er, men ved ikke hvad vi kan blive.
  • Vis mig den mand som ikke er slave af en lidenskab.

 

Engelske citater:

  • ...but we all are men, in our own natures frail, and capable of our flesh; few are angels... , King Henry VIII
  • A friend should bear his friend's infirmities
  • A woman's thought runs before her actions , As You Like It
  • Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.
  • All's welll that ends well
  • Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
  • And oft, my jealousy shapes faults that are not
  • Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell , Macbeth
  • Appetite, a universal wolf.
  • Base men, being in love, have then a nobility in their natures, more than is native to them.
  • Better three hours too soon than a minute too late. , Merry Wives of Windsor, Act II
  • But I am cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in. To saucy doubts and fears , Macbeth
  • But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes
  • Come, take choice of all my library, and so beguile thy sorrow.
  • Condemn the fault, and not the actor of it?
  • Conversation should be pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, free without indecency, learned without conceitedness, novel without falsehood.
  • Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once , Julius Caesar
  • Everyone can master a grief but he that has it
  • For my part, it was Greek to me. , Julius Caesar
  • Frailty, thy name is woman , Hamlet
  • Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
  • I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
  • The evil that men do lives after them,
  • The good is oft interred with their bones , Julius Caesar
  • He that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer.
  • He that wants money, means, and content, is without three good friends.
  • He thinks too much; such men are dangerous
  • He wears the rose Of youth upon him. , Antony and Cleopatra
  • Here is my journey's end, here is my butt, And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. , (Othello)
  • How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a weary world.
  • How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
  • To have a thankless child!
  • I am a man more sinned against than sinning
  • I can call spirits from the vastly deep. Why so can I, or so can nay man; but will they come when you call for them?
  • I care not, a man can die but once; we owe God and death
  • I do think it is their husband's faults If wives do fall , Othello
  • I dote on his very absence
  • I have a man's mind, but a woman's might , Julius Caesar
  • I say there is no darkness but ignorance.
  • If all the year were playing holidays, to sport would be as tedious as to work
  • If music be the food of love, play on: give me excess of it.
  • If we are marked to die, we are enough to do our country loss; and if to live, the fewer men, the greater share of honor
  • If you can look into the seeds of time, And say which grain will grow and which will not, Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear Your favours not your hate , Macbeth
  • If you have tears, prepare to shed them now , Julius Caesar
  • I'll note you in my book of memory.
  • In nature's infinite book of secrecy a little I can read
  • It is a wise father that knows his own child
  • Jesters do often prove prophets
  • Kindness, nobler ever than revenge.
  • Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments. Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove.
  • Let the end try the man
  • Life is a tale told by an idiot -- full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
  • Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under it
  • Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.
  • Love is merely a madness.
  • Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind; And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind
  • Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.
  • Love speaks not with eyes, but with the mind; therefore, is the winged cupid painted blind?
  • Maids want nothing but husbands, and when they have them, they want everything
  • Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.
  • Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
  • Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are the underlings , Julius Caesar
  • Men's vows are women's traitors
  • My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite. , Romeo and Juliet
  • Nothing in his life became him like the leaving it
  • O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock, The meat it feeds on
  • Oh God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains!
  • Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt
  • Poor Brutus, with himself at war. , Julius Caesar
  • Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much.
  • Simply the thing that I am shall make me live.
  • Sleep she as sound as careless infancy
  • Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.
  • Some innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt. , Ant & Cleo
  • Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind
  • Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge
  • Take these again, for to the noble mind. Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind. , Ophelia, Hamlet
  • The attempt and not the deed confounds us. , (Macbeth)
  • The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps over a cold decree
  • The course of true love never did run smooth. , Midsummer Nights Dreamr, Act I
  • The Devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape
  • The fault, dear Brutus, lies not in our stars, but in ourselves if we are underlings
  • The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers , Henry VI
  • The miserable have no other medicine But only hope
  • The undiscovered country form whose born no traveler returns , Hamlet
  • The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.
  • The winter of our discontent , Richard III
  • The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast
  • There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy , Hamlet, Act I, Scene 5
  • There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so , Hamlet, Hamlet
  • There's a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will , Hamlet
  • These violent delights have violent ends
  • They say miracles are past , (All's Well that Ends Well)
  • Things must be as they may. , Henry V
  • Things won are done; joy's soul lies in the doing
  • This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man , Polonius, Hamlet
  • Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.
  • Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss. , Pericles, Act I
  • To be a well-favored man is the gift of fortune, but to write or read comes by nature.
  • To climb steep hills requires slow pace at first.
  • To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man. , Hamlet, Act I, Scene 3
  • To weep is to make less the depth of grief. , Henry VI
  • Truth hath a quiet breast.
  • Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. , (Henry IVI)
  • We know what we are, but know not what we may be.
  • Were kisses all the joys in bed, one woman would another wed.
  • What's in a name? That which we call a rose.… , (Romeo and Juliet)
  • What's past is prologue. , The Tempest
  • When my love swears that she is made of truth, I do believe her, though I know she lies.
  • Where the offense is, let the great ax fall. , Hamlet
  • Who can be patient in extremes? , Henry VI
  • Who can control his fate? , Othello, Act V
  • Why, then 'tis none to you; for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so: to me it [Denmark] is a prison , Hamlet, Act 2, scene 2
  • Wife and child, Those precious motives, those strong knots of love. , Macbeth
  • Words are no deeds. , Henry VIII
  • Words pay no debts. , Troilus and Cressida

 

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